Tag Archives: writing

How to (Really) Make $1,000,000 Selling E-Books – Real-World Case Studies

See on Scoop.itWriting for Kindle

Who will be the JK Rowling of self-publishing? Better still: who will be the legions who make an extra $1,000-$1,000,000 per year?

Penelope‘s insight:

 

Do indie authors have even the remotest of chances to become the next $1,000,000 success story? The answer is YES! This guest post on the blog of Tim Ferriss of the “4 Hour Body” and “4 Hour Work Week” has a wealth of information on selling ebooks in this new age of publishing.

Here’s a preview of what you will learn:

 o Why did best-selling Author Barry Eisler turn down a $500,000 offer from his publisher in favor of publishing his own books?

 o Why is Amazon now selling more ebooks than printed books?

 o How can you figure out what niche to choose in to publish your book?

 o How do you go about creating your ebook?

 o What about formatting and designing a cover?

 o What to do about marketing and promotion of your ebook?

 o What is the best price point for your ebook?

If you’ve given up writing an ebook for fear of the competition, read this article and start your planning today. The soon you get started, the sooner you could also have a successful book topping the Amazon charts. 

 ***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing for Kindle”***

Link to the original article: http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2013/04/04/how-to-make-1000000-selling-e-books-tactics-and-case-studies/

See on www.fourhourworkweek.com

Leave a Comment

Filed under BLOG, Kindle Books, Uncategorized

Hugh Howey: Self-publishing is the future — and great for writers

See on Scoop.itWriting for Kindle

“Books have changed forever, and that’s good. Writers will find readers and make more money going it alone, like me.”

Penelope‘s insight:

 

Hugh Howey wanted to find out if there were other success stories out there when he posed a question on the Kindle Boards. He started a thread entitled “The Self Published Authors I Want to Hear From.” He wanted to find those making $100 to $500 a month. He had a sneaking suspicion that there were many. He said that every response he received started with a variation of: “I’m actually making a lot more than that.”

 How about these stories:

o JAN STRNAD, a 62-year-old educator hoping to retire in four years. In 2012, he made $11,406.31 from his work.  He now makes around $2,000 a month.

o ROBERT J. CRANE, His monthly income had gone from $110.29 in June to $13,000+ in November.

o RACHEL SCHURIG has sold 100,000 e-books and made 6 figures last year.

o RICK GUALTIERI cleared over $25,000 in 2012 from his writing.

o AMANDA BRICE writes teen mysteries and adult romantic comedies in her spare time. She averages $750 a month with her work.

Do you have story inside of you just waiting to be heard? Never has there been such a time in history that doors to publishing success are flung as wide open as they are today. Just think–if you start your writing today, you could be the next self-publishing success story tomorrow!

 ***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing for Kindle”***

Link to the original article: http://www.salon.com/2013/04/04/hugh_howey_self_publishing_is_the_future_and_great_for_writers/

 

 

See on www.salon.com

Leave a Comment

Filed under BLOG, Kindle Books, Uncategorized

50 pieces of writing advice from authors

See on Scoop.itWriting “Rightly”

Writers – well, good writers anyway – understand words. They have this uncanny knack of knowing which one to use and when – and just think, there are thousands upon thousands upon thousands of the blighters.

 

Penelope‘s insight:

 

Hover over a picture and mine yourself a quote from one of 50 Writers that you can latch onto and gleen from. Here are a few of my favorites:

ERNEST HEMINGWAY – “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.”

HARPER LEE – “Any writer worth his salt writes to please himself… It’s a self-exploratory operation that is endless. An exorcism of not necessarily his demon, but of his divine discontent.”

SYLVIA PLATH – “And by the way, everything in life is writable about if you have the outgoing guts to do it, and the imagination to improvise. The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt.” 

EDGAR ALLAN POE – “Words have no power to impress the mind without the exquisite horror of their reality.” 

W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM – “There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.”

  ***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing Rightly”***

 Link to the original article and all the quotes and quotees: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/50-pieces-of-writing-advice-from-authors

See on shortlist.com

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized, WRITING TIPS

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling

See on Scoop.itWriting for Kindle

These rules were originally tweeted by Emma Coats, Pixar’s Story Artist. Number 9 on the list – When you’re stuck, make a list of what wouldn’t happen next – is a great one and can apply to writers in all genres.

 

Penelope‘s insight:

I am tucking this list of Pixar’s “22 Rules of Storytelling” into my writer’s toolbox to pull out when I am working on my writing for Kindle. I can readily pick up some new ideas by quickly scanning the list, and referring back to these rules could truly get you out of some stuck-in-the-mud storylines.

I’m fondly recalling Pixar’s Movie, “Up”. If they used these rules in writing the love story of Carl and Ellie, then these rules would also work great for romance stories written for Kindle. Their beautiful story in the movie is the shortest, most eloquent and touching love story I think I have ever seen. Although it was between two digitally created characters, every time I watch it, I sob like a baby.

Pixar knows of which they speak. This one is a keeper.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing for Kindle”***

Link to the original article: http://aerogrammestudio.com/2013/03/07/pixars-22-rules-of-storytelling/

See on aerogrammestudio.com

Leave a Comment

Filed under Kindle Books, Uncategorized, WRITING TIPS

This Itch of Writing: Showing and Telling: the basics

See on Scoop.itWriting “Rightly”

Writing, talking about writing, reading writing and sometimes hating writing:
a blog by novelist Emma Darwin

Penelope‘s insight:

 

This is one of the best articles I have seen on the Writing Basics of “Showing” and “Telling”. The author would rather call it “Evoking” and “Informing” and I tend to agree.

Beginning writers naturally do more telling than showing, which is usually where we all begin. Once you get into the process of writing on a regular basis, you want your writing to “evoke” some kind of emotion in the reader.

Not that telling is wrong. There is a place for telling. Children’s stories will use the “telling” or “informing” of a narrator more than the “showing” or “evoking”. Once upon a time…

Take a look at the article for some very specific examples, and another helpful writer’s tip about “psychic distance”.

   

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing Rightly”***

 

Link to the original article and the full interview: http://emmadarwin.typepad.com/thisitchofwriting/showing-and-telling-the-basics.html

See on emmadarwin.typepad.com

Leave a Comment

Filed under BLOG, Uncategorized, WRITING TIPS

The Self-Pubbed Writer Who Wrote the Next Great Sci-Fi Saga

See on Scoop.itWriting for Kindle

You can also listen to this article. When bookstore employee and indie author Hugh Howey published his short story “Wool” as a 99-cent e-book on Amazon in July of 2011, he wasn’t banking on the story transforming his career.

 

Penelope‘s insight:

  

I’m in the middle of reading the wildly successful “Wool” permanent free book that sits out on Amazon. Sci-fi fan, I am not, but the story is intriguing. Bookstore employee and indie author, Hugh Howey had no idea that publishing his short story out on the web would completely change his life. He had written nothing else after this one, but fans reached out to him to finish his futuristic short story to satisfy their desire for more work from this author.

As Wool opens, Holston, the sheriff of the silo is being sent to “cleaning,” a punishment that takes him to the toxic surface to scrub the sensors that project a view of the world above to the silo below. The description of the view is one of the only clues Howey provides about the world before the silo was created. It’s a “familiar and rotting skyline” in which “ancient glass and steel stood distantly where people, it was suspected, had once lived aboveground.”

 By reaching out to Howey and leaving reviews that asked for more, fans helped conjure the fictional world that has come to mean so much to them. And through the power of self-publishing and social media, Howey converted interest in the first story into dedicated fandom and hundreds of thousands of e-book sales. Self-publishers can always learn from studying what is currently working, and tweak it to fit into their own self-publishing.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing for Kindle”***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/books/2013/03/hugh_howey_and_wool_how_the_self_pubbed_sci_fi_writer_relates_to_fans.2.html

 

See on www.slate.com

Leave a Comment

Filed under Kindle Books, Uncategorized, WRITING TIPS

A Map to Get Out of Writer’s Block

See on Scoop.itWriting for Kindle

If you’re a writer, chances are you’ve experienced writer’s block. Consider this the map that will outline your escape route.

 

Penelope‘s insight:

 

What a great tool to keep handy when you just can’t write any more and you are not sure of the reason. Personally, I’m going to print this out and keep it close by when I:

o Just don’t know what to do with my character

o My plot has lost its ooomph

o The story just feels a bit stale, or

o I’ve lost my way

 This excellent infographic will give you a route to choose, depending upon your writing issue. Try it the next time you end up in a writing dilemma.

 

 ***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing Rightly”***

 Link to the original article and the full interview: http://nybookeditors.com/book-editing-copy-editing-proofreading-self-publishing-blog/2013/3/12/a-map-to-get-out-of-writers-block#sthash.rQ3VMP3M.Yk0iki6b.dpbs

See on nybookeditors.com

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized, WRITING TIPS

Margo Berendsen: Love story plots, or 13 ways to mess with your characters

See on Scoop.itWriting for Kindle

Penelope‘s insight:
 
Are you considering writing a romance novel for Kindle? They are hot sellers, and you’ve got countless romance genres to choose from. If you are stuck for ideas, this excellent post will jumpstart your thinking in the area of love.

This author gives us Love Story Plots, or “13 different ways to mess with your characters.” You can even cross over into the paranormal romance genre. (Movies: “Avatar” or the “Twilight” series).

If you are considering the YA (young adult) romance genre, a great example are the Kindle book covers of a very successful romance novelist, Rachel Hanna. Make sure that you aim for a great plot that appeals to your chosen audience (this may take some research), and an eye-catching book cover. Here’s an interview that I had with Rachel recently. You can listen in to get some ideas of your own, or just take a peek at her beautiful covers. Her audience loves her!

 http://www.blogtalkradio.com/philosbooks/2013/03/01/interview-with-best-selling-romance-novelist-rachel-hanna

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing for Kindle”***

 Link to the original article: http://margoberendsen.blogspot.com/2011/02/love-story-plots-or-13-ways-to-mess.html

 

 

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under Kindle Books, Uncategorized, WRITING TIPS

George Will: The art of good writing – STLtoday.com

See on Scoop.itWriting for Kindle

George Will: The art of good writing STLtoday.com You will not want to skip anything in William Zinsser’s short essays written for the American Scholar magazine’s website and now collected in “The Writer Who Stayed,” a book that begins with him…

 

Penelope‘s insight:

 

On writing from Elmore Leonard, “I leave out parts that people skip.” Take note all indie authors and self-publishers wanting to make their own special noise on the Kindle marketplace.

Our “endlessly supple” English language will, William Zinsser says, “do anything you ask it to do, if you treat it well. Try it and see.” Try Zinsser’s short essays for the American Scholar magazine’s website and now collected in “The Writer Who Stayed,” a book that begins with him wondering why “every year student writing is a little more disheveled.”

I find it a shame that newspapers had to “dumb down” the articles to read at six grade levels. The ebook marketplace is getting fierce, but as the cream “also rises”, the best, brightest and superbly written books will rise to the top of the heap. I still have faith.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing for Kindle”***

 Link to the original article: http://www.stltoday.com/news/opinion/columns/george-will/george-will-the-art-of-good-writing/article_7d165c9d-fadf-56f5-ad1d-a07169cfbf26.html

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under Uncategorized, WRITING TIPS

The Power of Words | Writing Tips

See on Scoop.itWriting “Rightly”

Wonderful and highly inspirational video. Reminds us all to strive for authentic and purposeful communication. So chose your words wisely. They are extremely powerful.

Penelope‘s insight:

 

This beautiful video is a less than 2 minutes, but I guarantee it will be time well spent– and will give you new “vision”.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing Rightly”***

 Link to the original video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hzgzim5m7oU&feature=player_embedded

See on www.youtube.com

Leave a Comment

Filed under BLOG, Uncategorized, WRITING TIPS