Tag Archives: reading

A Secret Site Chock-Full of Hungry Readers Begging to be Fed!

 

Wattpad

24 Million Readers Around the Globe are Waiting for You!

Riddle: Where Can You Find 24 Million Hungry Readers in search of Writers? Tweet this.

Answer: Wattpad.com

Many authors virtually ignore this site, while readers are beating their doors down. I’m as guilty as the rest. Readers need stories to read. We can, and should oblige them. We also should be developing our writer’s community to find our tribe of readers. This site is the perfect place to begin.

Authors need readers.

Readers need writers.

We can help each other.

A marriage made in heaven.

I attended a very informative webinar on Wednesday evening, sponsored by NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). This webinar featured Ashleigh Gardner, Head of Content of Publishing for Wattpad. She was a wealth of information and I couldn’t scribble fast enough.

This site could be an oasis for frustrated authors to find their avid fan base. Tweet this.

If you’re fed up with all the social media noise and feel like you’re alone in your quest for readers, check out Wattpad. I know the stats will blow you away, as they did me.

The Readers

  •  24 MILLION USERS on this site
  • They flock to the site to read.
  • 80% are on mobile phones and tablets
  • Most are reading with downloadable APP
  • ½  are using their web interface
  • 9:00 PM is the most popular time for reading
  • Older demographic – 40% in 18-30 age group
  • YA (Young Adult) – Core group of teens on site
  • The most popular books in the Philippines are read on Wattpad
  • Not everyone wants to publish
  • Readers turn into purchasers!

 The Writers

  • Self-publishers: Post a variety of writing
  • Collect raw data in real time
  • Keep mobile readers in mind as you are posting
  • ½ of writers are posting from mobile devices
  • Shorter chapters are more popular
  • Short book descriptions are more popular
  • Put a “call to action” at the end of each chapter (i.e., Come back next week for the next chapter! or visit (website)
  • Books are placed into a category (romance, sci-fi, etc.) for searching
  • Tag book with good themes and keywords
  • Genre fiction does really well.
  • Literary fiction does well
  • Writers can critique other stories in the forums
  • Create eye-catching “thumbnail” book covers 

Genres (Choose one and get started!)

Romance, Fantasy, Paranormal, Horror, Historical Fiction, Fan Fiction, Short Story, Chick-Lit, Vampire, Spiritual, Classics, Science Fiction, Humor, Mystery/Thriller, Adventure, Teen Fiction, Poetry, Non-Teen Fiction, Action, Werewolf, Non-Fiction, Other

 Advantages for Writers

  • Publishers have offered contracts to popular authors who have a following
  • *NEW Feature* Get feedback from “in-line” commenting on your work.
  • Built-in “critique” as you post your novel.
  • Your readers can talk right inside the story (how cool is that?)
  • Authors can feed off those comments and edit the story
  • Instantaneous feedback to see what appeals and what doesn’t
  • Audience provides motivation boost to the author.
  • Authors don’t want to disappoint readers, so they show up with new material
  • Readers cannot copy or paste or download chapters, so work is protected.
  • Wattpad sends out 2.5 million push notifications each day!
    Where can you get that much free publicity each and every day for your work?
     

How Authors Can Get Started

There are only a few things for newcomers to keep in mind when getting started with Wattpad. It’s simple.

  • Find new people
  • Follow them
  • Read their book chapters
  • Scan community message board
  • Get involved and post a chapter
  • Look for similar stories to yours
  • Link up with other authors

Tips & Tricks 

  • Don’t post as an island.
  • Go “native.”
  • Cross promote.
  • Let people know you’re there.
  • Your Audience has an audience

Fun Facts

Beth Reekles, 17, is an author on the site. The then-15-year-old used story-sharing site Wattpad to release her novel, The Kissing Booth, which earned more than 19 million views and caught the attention of Random House Children’s Publishers U.K. She was named Times Magazine most influencial teenager. Famous Authors Margaret Atwood, Amanda Hocking, and Paulo Coelho have profiles on the site. They may share deleted scenes, short stories, or entire stories with their fans.

INSIDER TIP: Dedicate your work to a high profile user and it will appear on their page. Wattpad makes it super easy to get started. Click on over to Wattpad, set up your user profile and password. Start browsing around to get a feel for the site. Post some short stories or parts of your exciting and suspenseful novel, and watch your community grow! Oh, and start out by connecting with me http://Wattpad.com/PenelopeSilvers and share your comments as I post my novel. I would really appreciate the feedback.

What are your feelings about using a story-sharing site such as Wattpad? Does it excite you or scare you?
 

 Leave me a comment and let me know!

PenelopeBTR2tiny

Penelope Silvers is founder of PhilosBooks.com,
where “Independent Authors are introduced to the World!”
She is a freelance writer, publisher, and radio host of
Penelope’s Book Chat on Blog Talk Radio.

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Mary Higgins Clark Does it Again…..

The Lost YearsThe Lost Years by Mary Higgins Clark

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

It’s been quite a while since I read a MHC book, but the style remains the same. She always brings you along on the journey quite nicely with an interesting cast of characters, locations, suspenseful situations, and a murder mystery. I appreciate the fact that you always know what the main character is thinking, and feeling, and the writing will leave you wanting to know more at the end of each chapter. Of course, she brought in Alvirah and Willy, the amateur detectives, to help solve the crime. Since I have become accustomed to her writing style, I figured out the murderer about halfway through. That does not take away from the fact that her story was well written and suspenseful. Just what we’ve come to expect from Mary Higgins Clark.

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Stray Far from Stay Close

Stay CloseStay Close by Harlan Coben

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I picked this book up because of a review that grabbed my attention in our local paper. I have never read any prior work from this author, and knew nothing about him. From reading reviews of his prior novels, I think I will go back and try one of those to see what the fuss was all about. The opening of the book started out interestingly enough to capture my attention. I was intrigued to find out all about the different characters and how their lives entwined together. However, as the story wore on, I found myself less and less interested, to the point of not even caring who the heck the killer was. The Ken and Barbie characters just did not ring true at all. Maybe there are really nutty people out there like this, but I didn’t believe it in this novel. The characters didn’t hold my attention, and it seemed to go off in one direction, only to halt and head off in another. I’ll reserve judgment until I’ve read one of his prior novels. I really can’t recommend this one.

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Final Saga in Time Travel to Rome


by Francine Rivers

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is the third and final book in the “Mark of the Lion” triolgy. This book was very good, but not my favorite of the series. I really enjoyed the first two in the series about the romance between wealthy Roman, Marcus, and his sister’s slave, Hadassah. This book focuses on Atretes, a gladiator, who was trained to be angry and trained to kill. This book is entertaining, yet powerful in its message about the destruction of anger and the power of forgiveness.

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Write About your World

One of the first Kindle books I actually bought and paid for was “Rumors of Water–Thoughts on Creativity and Writing” by L.L. Barket. The title does not hint at the valuable nuggets inside this book. This is a book about writing–writing about your world. The lessons are woven right into the stories. The author writes about her experiences in her every day world, which consists of teaching her two daughters at home. Lest you think this would be scarce material to write about, she surprises us. The stories spring from their lives, and the language beautiful. Did you know you can weave a wonderful story around tea and flowers and picking colorful vegetables? It is true.

Each of the book’s seven headings tells part of the story:

Momentum
Voice
Habits
Structure
Publishing
Glitches
Time

The one big take away from this book, is that all of us have a story. Our stories–yours and mine–are stories that need telling, and there are people that need to hear them.

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Reading Road to Writing

Do you want to be a writer?

If so, you first need to be a reader.

Sound strange? It isn’t. You learn how to write from reading. When I was in first grade, we learned to read from “Dick and Jane”, “Spot and Puff” books. We also learned to write letters, sound them out phonetically, and finally form words that we wrote on our 1-inch lined paper, with a dotted line cutting the space in half. The reading and writing went hand in hand.

As first graders, we read. We wrote.

It is the natural order of things.

When I first began the process of teaching my daughter how to read and write, we used a program called “Writing Road to Reading” by Romalda Spaulding. It was almost like a college level course for a grade schooler in phonetics, reading, and writing. We had to use a program heavy in phonetics since my daughter was partially deaf at the time. She may not have been able to fully hear, but she could see the sounds I was forming on my lips, and the sounds became clear to her as she repeated them and wrote them in her notebook.

When teaching both of my children, we started using a program in grade school that incorporated all facets of language arts together. It just made sense for us. It got extremely tiring having separate reading, spelling, grammar and writing programs.

Life became a lot simpler when I started teaching a program that tied all of those entities together. The name of the program was “Total Language Plus”. It was wonderful. The kids each got to pick out a classic book of their choosing, and a yellow workbook accompanied the book. The lessons were pulled from the book they read. The lessons were reading comprehension, weekly spelling words, grammar, and writing exercises.

My children read, and they wrote.

As an adult, it can sometimes be hard to find time to read. But try to sneak in some time when you can. Read a variety of book genres to expand your mind. I love Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Scarlet Letter”, and I’m now reading “House of the 7 Gables”. The language is challenging, to be sure, but I enjoy analyzing the writing of a classic book as I read it. I’m amazed out how much description he goes into to describe even the teensiest little item.

Be a diligent reader to learn how to be a fantastic writer!

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My Books, My Friends.

I remember reading my Nancy Drew books when I was a teen. I would hole myself up in my room to savor and then devour them. The feeling that came over me when I held the “Secret of the Old Clock” in my hands was like anticipation of the first bite of a german chocolate cupcake with coconuty icing. Yum.

Reading was addicting.

I couldn’t wait to dig into a new book. I looked forward to the time I could shut my door, curl up on my bed, and shut out the world. I wanted to be drawn into the world of Nancy, Bess, George and Ned. They were now my friends. My comrades. I was solving the mystery right along with them!

Much of the fun of reading these books came from thinking through the clues and the mysteries, “I bet it was old man Thomas that stole the clock”, or “The maid was the only one who could have known about this…” or “That sneaky gardener sure acts like he is guilty…” The clues would pile up, and I would already be forming a picture of the culprit in my mind, but sometimes the picture would change several times before the book ended.

I always loved endings with a twist. Ones that made me say, “Wow! I would never have come up with that angle!” I loathe books which are predictable and scattered with not very likeable characters. I feel like I am wasting precious time with them. I adore the twists and turns that make my gut clench with that feeling of anxiety. I agonize and experience injustice right along with the protagonist, and love to root for the killer or villain to come to justice.

Shouldn’t justice prevail?

Sometimes the hero first has to slog his or her way through loss, pain, scorn, multiple battles, rage and downright injustice, but they should always win out in the end. Books take me to another world, another place, another time. New friends are celebrated, enemies despised, heroes rooted for, continents traversed, love savored, loss mourned, and redemption cheered.

My friends. Books.

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