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Tips for Book Cover Designs

License: Creative Commons image source

Eye catching book covers -not only draw the attention of buyers in book stores, to come by and flick through their pages; but often, prompts them to buy these as well! “Studies have shown that bookstore browsers take ten to twenty seconds on average to decide whether to purchase or reshelve a book. That’s not a lot of time to grab a reader’s attention with sparkling wit and singing prose,” declares the website divinecaroline.com.

 Our first impression of anything is based on how it looks, and the same applies to ‘book covers’ as well! The important thing to note here, is – that where marketing books is concerned-a book cover design, acts like an ‘advertisement.’ People frequenting bookstores; look at book covers with the assumption -that they have been designed to convey the soul of the story! Not keeping this in mind, when creating a book cover design- would mean losing out on a fantastic opportunity to reach out and sell, to target markets!  To be able to do so, however, a book cover design needs to be just right. Given below, are some time-tested tips that help make a book cover design saleable!

Book Cover Design Tips

Do Your Homework on Book Cover Design Elements in Genres Similar to Yours

“If you’re having trouble coming up with an idea for your cover, it may be a good idea to do some research. Go to a bookstore and examine books of the same genre. This can give you some ideas or suggestions” for your own book cover design, advises Author House.

Use Your Book Cover Design to Convey ‘What Your Book is About’

‘Being clear on what you want to convey through your book cover design is vital,’ believes, ‘thebookdesigner.com.’ “Your book is about something, and the cover ought to reflect that one idea clearly. One element that takes control, that commands the overwhelming majority of attention, of space, of emphasis on the cover…At a glance your prospect ought to know; the genre of your book, the general subject matter or focus, and some idea of the tone or “ambiance” of the book,” it suggests.

You Book Cover Design Must Evoke Curiosity

Independent author -Jan Bear, believes that, a good book cover design is one- that arouses the curiosity in book buyers and readers!  “A good book cover sets up a problem so powerful that your brain won’t let go of it until it knows the solution. That hint of a story will get a reader to open the book and find out if the author really answers the question posed on the cover,” she states on marketyourbookblog.com. In her opinion, in order to succeed, your book cover design- must focus on ‘connecting with your audience; capturing the mood of the story; conveying the type of story; and, assuring the buyer that your book is the work of a professional.’

Pay Attention to the ‘Front and Back Covers’ and the ‘Spine’ of Your Book

When going in for a book cover design, pay attention to the ‘front cover,’ ‘back cover’ and ‘the spine,’ of your book-suggests ‘divinecaroline.com.’ “Fonts are another consideration; a well-designed book cover will use several,” it notes, adding: “The front cover gets your attention, but the back cover sells a book.”

The website, goes on to highlight a lesser known fact- “Something many readers don’t realize is that bookstore real estate is purchased, just like in the supermarket. Books don’t randomly end up with the front cover facing out or on an endcap at the beginning of an aisle. Placement on a table at the front of the store during holidays can cost a publisher in the tens of thousands of dollars. If a publisher is not willing to eat into the marketing budget for placement, a book may languish spine by spine with the rest of the books on the shelves. This makes spine design almost as important as the rest of the cover’s.”

Be Aware of the Technicalities Involved in Book Cover Design

“There are a few technical guidelines to keep in mind” when it comes to your book cover design, cautions ‘Author House.’ “The first is to be aware of copyright issues when submitting images for your cover. It is also important that your images be high resolution. Resolution refers to the crispness or quality of focus in your images. Cover images must have a resolution of no less than 300 PPI or DPI. In addition, they must be a size suitable for their intended use,” it finishes.

This article was written by Meredith Lewis, who trains writers on marketing their books creatively and also conducts book cover design workshops.

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Break Out of that Writing Rut: Tell–Don’t Show–Write More of What You Love!

Keep a goal in mind as you write. What is your purpose?

Writing is Hard Work. You are Faced with a Blank Sheet of Paper

Writing is hard work. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Anyone who says it is easy—is delusional—and probably not writing.

“I just sit down at the typewriter and bleed.” – Ernest Hemingway

Let me tell you a story.

I’ve been writing fairly consistently since 2006. Before that time, I wrote strictly in my journal. Nothing fancy. It was one of those marbled composition notebooks you can buy at Walmart for 10 cents around the start of the school year. I wrote to make sense of all the mixed up thoughts in my head and to try to combat the depression that threatened to overtake me. It didn’t go any further than that. I never thought of myself as a ‘true writer’ until probably about a year ago.

What set me on the path of thinking this way?

The Kindle I received for Christmas.

I began searching out all the books I could find to load up my Kindle. Free and not so free. Books on fiction and non-fiction. I realized some of them were pure junk, and I knew I could do better.

I began writing with a goal in mind.

Self-publish to Amazon.

I now had a goal.

A goal to achieve.

A target to hit.

I began with non-fiction, and just this year I’m making the switch to fiction. There is quite a learning curve. Instead of learning everything there was to know about publishing an e-book to Amazon, I made the switch to learning everything there was to know about writing.

This is not a post about learning all the ins and outs of self-publishing. Suffice it to say, that it took about two years of dedicated study before I felt that I knew enough to publish my first book on Amazon. If you are interested in learning self-publishing, promotion and cutting down on the learning curve of writing fiction, these are the courses I recommend:

Kindling Membership Forum

This course is a clearinghouse of practically anything and everything there is to know about writing and publishing to Kindle. Geoff Shaw continues to improve and consistently add more into the course for his members. 

Good Fiction Fast

This course will teach you how to write fiction, and write it fast! I’d been slogging through book after book on writing, and getting more and more confused. This book will cut through the confusion to get you published quickly. You can start with non-fiction, but when you are ready to make the switch–check out Michelle Spiva’s course.

Two Books That Boosted my Writing

After I had learned about publishing to Kindle, then I set a goal to learn how to write better–and faster. There were two books that really stood out, from the crowd of writing books that jammed my Kindle.

These two transformed my writing.

This book, 2K to 10K, by Rachel Aaron was a book about how to write faster. What I gleaned from this book was this: Plan out what you are going to write about BEFORE you set down to type it up on the computer. I went back to my morning pages. I love the free flow of the pen to paper. It seems to help my thought processes to break it down that way first. I tried it. Voila!

Ideas began flowing again.

 

2K to 10K by Rachel Aaron

 

Then as I’ve been writing my first romance novel, I found myself stuck at 24,000 words. I was stuck and had to analyze what was happening with my writing.

I stopped writing on this story for a couple of months.

I saw a recommendation from a fellow writer on Facebook for Show, Don’t Tell by James Lofquist. This is a short little book that can be read in one sitting. What did I glean from this one?

Just write!

Just as I have been doing in the morning.

Write, let the ideas come, don’t stop them, and if you don’t know what to write, then make a list! (Tweet)

How freeing was this?

Very.

 

Tell, Don't Show, by James Lofquist

 

I gained the confidence to begin writing again.

I had to learn to stop being a perfectionist while writing. The time to correct and fix and polish is after a first draft is written. You must first get the story out in whatever means possible.

To make it easy to remember, I’ve summed up what I’ve learned in 11 simple tips:

  1. Don’t let the blank page intimidate you
  2. Write morning pages
  3. Plan out what you’re going to write BEFORE you head to the computer
  4. Make up a quick outline
  5. Show, Don’t Tell
  6. Don’t self-edit as you write
  7. Write everything you know about a scene
  8. List it if you’re not sure what to write
  9. Revise later
  10. Write consistently
  11. Write daily

Remember, it only takes an ant picking up and placing one grain of sand to build an anthill.

To write an entire book, it only takes the first word, then the next, and the next. (Tweet)

Be obedient and set an appointment with yourself to show up with pen in hand to write on the page or the computer. Make your appointment to write consistently, one word at a time, starting with the first one.

What helps you to write faster? What writing goals have you set for yourself?

Leave me a comment and let me know!

PenelopeBTR2tiny

Penelope Silvers is founder of PhilosBooks.com,
where “Independent Authors are introduced to the World!”
She is a freelance writer, publisher, and radio host of
Penelope’s Book Chat on Blog Talk Radio.

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Kindle Comic Creator – FREE on Amazon.com

See on Scoop.itWriting for Kindle

Penelope‘s insight:

 

Do you love reading comics? Do you draw funny pics that you dream of compiling into a book? Well, now stop dreaming and start creating your very own comics. Amazon makes it easy.

Amazon is always ahead of the curve. Now I see they have a Kindle Comic Creator that is a FREE download. I haven’t used this myself, but once you download their software from http://Amazon.com/kc2, you can start creating.

This looks like a fun diversion, and I’m looking forward to having some fun with it.

 ***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing for Kindle”***

 Link to the full article and your free download: http://amazon.com/kc2

See on www.amazon.com

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The Daily Routines of 15 Famous Writers

See on Scoop.itWriting for Kindle

A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a word on paper.

 

Penelope‘s insight:

This is productivity maniac Benjamin Franklin’s To-Do List for the day. What is yours? A writer’s life is not always cut and dried. Most of us have to squeeze in some writing amidst all the busy happenings in our lives. I would love to arise from my slumber and begin putting pen to page rapid fire, but as of this moment, I have to work within the boundaries of the life I am given. Here’s a look at 15 famous writers and how they find the time to write.

 *****This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on “Writing for Kindle”*****

 Link to the original article: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/11/20/daily-routines-writers/?_tmc=NG1bpRJ2dYOBoyoh8BlyKL6bvQdbk6IMDUzcuCV6ISU

 

See on www.brainpickings.org

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