All Authors Blog Blitz Featuring Author Aramis Barron

abarron

Roaming Cadenza ebook Cover  Dust Requiem ebook Cover

Today I am pleased to feature author Aramis Barron through the All Authors Blog Blitz put on at Goodreads by author Y. Correa. I hope you enjoy reading this article by Aramis, and will pick up one or both of his books. Enjoy!

 

Leave a Good Story by Aramis Barron

One of the biggest challenges I’ve encountered as a writer is turning interesting ideas into good writing. The theory is simple enough—have a good idea, write it down, flesh it out. Success! Or so the theory goes.

In practice, I’ve found there’s often some sort of disconnect where the awesome gets lost, and what started out as an innovative idea turns into boring clichés in a vain attempt to fill the page. Maybe this doesn’t happen to you, but if this sounds familiar, what can be done?

For me, the best option has been to ask this question: what do you expect to see vs. what would you like to see?

It’s all too easy to fill the page with some generic plot progression while waiting to get to the “good part,” but that’s exactly where excellent writing stands out—it takes advantage of every opportunity to add more to (or remove the unnecessary from) the story. For example, a star-struck couple fights over a misunderstanding and then they make up. That’s the storyline. But what if they didn’t? What if one went into a jealous rage and started an anti-dating corporation/poisoned every box of chocolates in the city/contracted the t-virus and flew away into outer space instead (depending on your genre)?

Think about every story you’ve read, heard, watched, in which you knew exactly what was coming next. How did you feel when you knew what the protagonist or cookie-cutter villain was going to do before they did? Then look at it from the other side: do you remember some of the greatest surprises you’ve ever read in a story? Why was it surprising? What made it work?

An example from literature (spoilers!): In the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, after Martin is revealed as a serial killer, he asks Blomkvist who killed his sister. This opens up a whole new, fascinating plot line since it is implied Martin had killed her, which although short, works very well and creates the opening for an even more surprising ending. Another example is from the television show Prison Break when Michael and Lincoln miss their plane after they escape Fox River. After everything that’s happened up to that point, the audience has a vested interest in seeing the brothers escape, and expects them to, only to watch them fail. As it turns out, failure is an acceptable storyline!

Each writer has their own methods and styles, but if you find your pieces need a little something more to stand out, consider the questions above and don’t be afraid to explore the results. Sometimes the plot or even the entire storyline may change—that’s okay! Moments happen in life that are completely messed up and change the way things are “supposed to go,” but those exact moments are the ones worth telling. In the end, explore different options and see what works best for you, but most of all—leave a good story.

Before I wrap this up, I’ll include a brief advert for my book series, A Bard’s Folktale. The first book, “Roaming Cadenza,” is about three high schoolers and their mental unstable college friend driving across country to get the hell out of their hometown just after graduation. Finally getting out of their protective bubble, however, they see just how difficult the “real world” can be, and whether they each have what it takes to get by. The second book, “Dustland Requiem,” (available June 25th) continues the story by dealing with the fallout of the group’s decisions and trying to survive the lawless desert of gangland Mexico.

For more information, including a free copy of the first e-book, please visit http://emarosa.net

T. Aramis Barron
His Website
Follow on Twitter

Please leave your comments and let Aramis know how much you enjoyed his post!

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under BLOG, Uncategorized, WRITING TIPS

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *